Women & War

The Women and War Program is a specialized program at SASC that was developed by Roya Ghafari in SASC’s second decade. Though SASC had established itself as an important source of feminist peer-based support for survivors of sexual violence, a services assessment in 1992 found that women of colour were less likely to access SASC services. To increase
accessibility for diverse women, SASC actively recruited women of non-majority communities in Ottawa as staff and volunteers. This program mainly provides support and advocacy to women
from a war zone, all immigrant women who have experienced violence are welcome.
1) Women and War Manual: Undoing the Knot
In our work towards the liberation of womyn and children, we have come to recognize how difficult it is to start a different life in a new country, especially when you do not have anyone to help and support you. Adjusting to a new language, a new culture and a new way of living can be tough and isolating.

We have been supporting survivors of violence for approximately twenty-five years.  Our approach is survivor-directed, which means our information comes from women directly. We believe that women are the experts in their lives and can make the right choices for themselves and their families.

For more information regarding the Women and War Program, please contact the program co-ordinator at (613) 725-2160 ext. 225 or at womenandwar@sascottawa.com.

Program & Services

The services within our Women and War program include:

  • Individual support.
  • Art expression Support group.
  • Advocacy around womyn’s rights and gender-based discrimination.
  • Accompaniment and referrals around medical, legal, and immigration issues.
  • Building networks with diverse communities.
  • Outreach and public education around the issues faced by survivors of war, rape, and torture.
  • Raising awareness and sensitivity to the issues of immigrant and refugee womyn and their families.
  • Opportunities to talk with other womyn on issues that are important to the womyn in their communities.
  • Opportunities to set up informal support networks in their communities.
Empowerment

We believe supporting the survivors of wartime violence against womyn is essential to our work. We provide a holistic approach in cooperation with organizations, communities, and families. If you come for support, your privacy and feeling of safety are our first concerns.